Mixed Feelings // Perspectives //

Being mixed is a part of my identity that I embrace. But it wasn’t always this way. As much as I believed to be unaffected by my skin color and where my parents were from, it did shape the way I looked out at the world and also how the world looked at me.

I soon realized that growing up as a person of color sheds a different lens on your life. Whether or not it is obvious, judgment is placed on all people. It is human nature to find a way to identify with one another – to connect with one another.

For mixed people, this can be a unique experience. Because you do not fit within one culture or the other specifically, you somehow remain on the outside of those cultures. Furthermore, while being a Canadian is what my nationality is, Canada is a country that encourages its citizens to embrace its multiculturalism as its identity. So it gets confusing.

Now that I’m older, I’ve learned how important it is to understand your roots and your heritage. It is only with understanding our history can we move into the future.

In my latest podcast, I speak with Jo who is also of mixed race. We bond and discuss our experiences growing up mixed and oddly enough have had very different perspectives on being mixed:

Are you mixed? Have you had similar experiences?  Sound off in the comments below! 


Subscribe to my YouTube channel
Follow me on Twitter
Check out my Tumblr

 

Advertisements

REVIEW: Moonlight – Outside the Shadows // Film That’s Snatching My Weave

Moonlight tells the story of a young boy named Chiron who is living in a ghetto with his mom. The film is split into three sections, each capturing a moment in time of Chiron’s growth as an individual. More than anything, the story is about identity (my favorite thing to talk about!) and finding a way to be at peace with who you are despite the way life has unfolded.

I enjoyed the layering in the film Moonlight. It covers being a person of color and poverty – Chiron being born into a not so ideal situation with his single mother addicted to drugs. The fact that these two concepts of being black and poor are a true reality for many,  I was glad to see this film tackle both in such an honest way. The struggles Chiron faces as a young boy in the ghetto are beautifully drawn with his desire for love from any one who has the patience to listen. It teaches of compassion and understanding – the foundation of who he becomes is set in the first act.

Moonlight covers off the forever unmoving ideology of masculinity. It challenges what it means to be a man in the world and what it takes to survive. The concept of sacrificing your own identity and putting your own life aside just to get by is something that struck a chord in me. Chiron is unable to understand who he can be and instead falls victim to his environment.

This film is a must watch. The display of these concepts- poverty, masculinity, and personal identity; they are all relatable to any person willing to look into themselves and then look out to the world. 


Subscribe to my YouTube channel
Follow me on Twitter
Check out my Tumblr

Why Being Gay and a POC in America Sucks RN

November 8th 2016. Toronto, Canada. The constant weather changes seemed to take me for a spin and I tucked in early. I woke up safe in my bed still feeling a minimal level of anxiety of a Trump win. And when I checked my phone riddled with texts from outraged friends announcing his win my heart sank. In past blogs I’ve mentioned that I identify as a person of color. I am also a gay man. The dual fringe. But I surely didn’t feel close to the amount of dread that my American counterparts were feeling just across the border.

I don’t think Donald Trump is the only monster in this situation. Yes, his campaign trail to the White House is littered with racial slurs, sexist remarks, and Islamophobic quips. But he was not the one who punched innocent peaceful protesters. He did not personally spit in faces of those same people. He may have been the man with the megaphone but he was just chanting back what his audience was giving him.

What I fear the most for the people of color and LGBT communities in the States right now is the fact that him being elected as President just gave every racist, sexist, homophobe, Islamophobe a baseball bat. And with that bat, a signed letter from the government that encourages this hateful behavior.

However, people of color are not going anywhere. The LGBT community is not going anywhere. Now is the opportunity to hold strong and stay together and remember that while this might be the current situation, we refuse to go backwards. This is the time our vigilance for injustice must be stricter and our voices to speak out to be louder. I know it’s not much, but I stand in support for all my POC/LGBT American brothers and sisters in this crucial time. Continue your fight. You’re far from being done.


Subscribe to my YouTube channel
Follow me on Twitter
Check out my Tumblr